What Happens to My Insurance if I Lose My Job?

//What Happens to My Insurance if I Lose My Job?

What Happens to My Insurance if I Lose My Job?

If you have had health coverage as an employee benefit and you leave your job, voluntarily or otherwise, one of your first concerns will be maintaining protection against the costs of health care. You can do this in one of several ways:

  • First, you should know that under a federal law (the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, commonly known as COBRA), group health plans sponsored by employers with 20 or more employees are required to offer continued coverage for you and your dependents for 18 months after you leave your job. (Under the same law, following an employee’s death or divorce, the worker’s family has the right to continue coverage for up to three years.) If you wish to continue your group coverage under this option, you must notify your employer within 60 days. You must also pay the entire premium, up to 102 percent of the cost of the coverage.
  • If COBRA does not apply in your case – perhaps because you work for an employer with fewer than 20 employees – you may be able to convert your group policy to individual coverage. The advantage of that option is that you may not have to pass a medical exam, although an exclusion based on a preexisting condition may apply, depending on your medical history and your insurance history.
  • If COBRA doesn’t apply and converting your group coverage is not for you, then, if you are healthy, not yet eligible for Medicare, and expect to take another job, you might consider an interim or short-term policy. These policies provide medical insurance for people with a short-term need, such as those temporarily between jobs or those making the transition between college and a job. These policies, typically written for two to six months and renewable once, cover hospitalization, intensive care, and surgical and doctors’ care provided in the hospital, as well as expenses for related services performed outside the hospital, such as X-rays or laboratory tests.
  • Another possibility is obtaining coverage through an association. Many trade and professional associations offer their members health coverage – often HMOs – as well as basic hospital-surgical policies and disability and long-term care insurance. If you are self-employed, you may find association membership an attractive route.
By |2013-02-19T22:05:23+00:00October 14th, 2011|Categories: Buyers Guide For Health Insurance|Tags: , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Jesse is the Founder and CEO of Smedley Insurance Group, Inc. and iHealthBrokers.com. He is a licensed health and life insurance broker in 47 states and the District of Columbia. Jesse specializes in Medicare and health insurance benefits packages for businesses and their employees. Jesse is the designated responsible broker for Smedley Insurance Group, Inc. He founded Smedley Insurance Group after working for a small captive insurance agency where he was required to sell perhaps the worst health insurance plans to consumers because it was all the company had to offer. He knew there had to be a better way and thus, SIG was born. Jesse can be reached toll free at (866) 260-9829, Ext. 101. His email address is: his first name @iHealthBrokers.com.

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